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Key Elements of a Great Magician

Key Elements of a Great Magician

If you perform great magic, you are considered a miracle worker; if you perform bad magic, why though? 

We often wonder what makes a great magician. I saw recently, a discussion post on Instagram, the order of importance of method, effect, persona and performance. Honestly, those are the four things that I believe make a good magician; in any order really, as long as there is balance. 

The persona should be confident, charismatic, and courageous. It takes a lot of courage to perform in front of people, and even more to approach strangers. The confidence is part of the approach, but also the confidence to believe in what you are doing, and believe in yourself. If you don’t think the effect is going to work, or it won’t fool people, then it will not. The charisma allows people to not be wary of you, in any way. If you have the special something, that, spark, people will be open to your character and your performance. If you try to outsmart spectators, or show that you are above them, you are only asking to be torn down.

"You can be a great move monkey but still nobody will like you because you have a horrible presentation and persona." -IG:_thekingsmagic_

Method and effect, both key elements in all parts and facets of magic. Is one better than the other? Does a good effect and a poor method outweigh a poor effect and a great method? No, there should be a good balance of both. If either is lacking, then the entire performance will suffer greatly. There are a lot of great methods out there, and even better effects. This all boils down to the idea of what you would like to happen, and the means in which to accomplish it. Ask around, do some research, and adapt to what you find. There are hundreds of books and of hundreds of hours of footage, and a wealth of knowledge that spans many lifetimes when referring to the conjuring arts. The truth is out there, do not let your art suffer because you chose to settle for “good enough.”

This brings us to the performance. How do you want to be perceived? There are people who like to be calm, collected, and confident. There are also those who are more boisterous, loud, and appear more nonchalant. It depends on what you are trying to achieve, and the way you are going to go about doing so. Alas, we are entertainers and performers, but remember that this art spawns from the true belief in sorcery and conjuring. Somewhere it turned into circus sideshows but I digress. You are the best version of yourself, as long as you continue to progress, and learn from your mistakes. The performance is your time to shine, so go for it.

"When people tell stories about magic it’s a persona that does the crazy magic. The magician shares the magic." IG:protectmagic

All of these things are pieces of who we are. Every single element represents the whole. We cannot lack in any of our domains, and there is no such thing as bringing your "B game." When you are on, you are on. Like a well oiled machine, everything works in harmony.

 

Check out the discussion and the account below.


https://www.instagram.com/p/BaNPqkIA707/?hl=en&taken-by=muchmorechat

https://www.instagram.com/muchmorechat/?hl=en

2 comments

  • Method is much less important than effect. A crappy method is never seen, so it can be crappy. Much like film, if you can’t see it it doesn’t exist.

    For example, whether you use a pass or a Marlo Tilt, the spectator still believes their card is in top of the deck. It doesn’t matter if you use the ‘easier’ or more comfortable way, the impression left is the same. Work smarter (and harder, but smarter first).

    Rachel Richardson
  • “..method, effect, persona and performance..”

    I completely agree. These four traits are extremely important to pay close attention to.

    I never want to settle for “good enough”, so I tend to go the extra miles as often as I can.
    By telling me that there is a limit, you are telling me that there is a point to surpass, a threshold to break.

    Through constant research, and practice and application, one will find those four traits to be easy to improve and keep balanced.

    Jak Hart

Leave a comment


2 comments

  • Method is much less important than effect. A crappy method is never seen, so it can be crappy. Much like film, if you can’t see it it doesn’t exist.

    For example, whether you use a pass or a Marlo Tilt, the spectator still believes their card is in top of the deck. It doesn’t matter if you use the ‘easier’ or more comfortable way, the impression left is the same. Work smarter (and harder, but smarter first).

    Rachel Richardson
  • “..method, effect, persona and performance..”

    I completely agree. These four traits are extremely important to pay close attention to.

    I never want to settle for “good enough”, so I tend to go the extra miles as often as I can.
    By telling me that there is a limit, you are telling me that there is a point to surpass, a threshold to break.

    Through constant research, and practice and application, one will find those four traits to be easy to improve and keep balanced.

    Jak Hart
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